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Stopping a Masturbation Addiction

Masturbation can be healthy but when it becomes an addiction, you need to stop the addiction. Here are a few steps to take control of the urges.

Stop Punishing yourself

Consider it this way: if you're constantly dwelling on the disapproval of masturbating, you're still thinking about masturbation all the time. Don't just trade in your masturbation addiction for another one — they're so closely related that you won't resolve anything. Instead, acknowledge that this has been a problem for you, but you will persevere to stop the impulse.

Resist the urge of sinking into despair by remembering the times spent feeling sorry for yourself when it could have been spent relinquishing your addiction. 

Get rid of temptations

Some of the temptations include access to pornographic material, being alone certain times of the day, boredom, and loneliness. Get rid of pornographic material by burning magazines, deleting sexy pictures and putting content blockers on your computer. Be preoccupied so that you do not get tempted to masturbate.

Find an a different outlet for your time and energy

Fill your life with engaging activities. The excitement of doing something different can help replace the urge to masturbate, and you'll have a go-to distraction next time you're tempted. Start writing, painting or reading, participate in sports and be with friends. 

Be patient and don't give up

Stopping a masturbation addiction won't hit you like a lightning bolt. It's a process that requires commitment, and you might make mistakes or relapse on occasions. The real struggle is persevering, so commit now that you won't let little mistakes stand in your way.Set up a reward system. Bribe yourself to stay on-track with rewards for good behavior. For instance, if you can go two whole weeks without masturbating once, treat yourself to a small indulgence like a new game or an ice cream cone. 

Seek help

If you've tried everything and just can't seem to get your addiction under control, it might be time to tell someone else about your problem and ask for assistance. Don't feel ashamed, and remember that many people have similar problems like an addiction. Seeking help is a brave action, and most people you ask will see it as such. Make an appointment with a medical professional. Counselors, psychologists and psychiatrists are all trained to help people with varying levels of addiction. Start by seeing a therapist in your area, who can assess your addiction and refer you to more specialized help if necessary. Several treatment options are available, from cognitive-behavior therapy to medication.